Skin Conditions and Education

Here at Authentic Aesthetics we don’t just provide our patients with treatments, we believe in also educating our patients on their skin conditions so they have a greater understanding of how the treatments work and how to manage their conditions afterwards.

Acne is a skin condition that affects the majority of the population at some point in their lives in varying degrees of severity. While most people who suffer from acne experience the condition when they reach puberty, adult acne can develop as late as your twenties or thirties. Characterised by congestion, redness and white pustules, acne most commonly affects the face but can also develop on the back and chest.

Acne scarring is common in skins that have suffered with acne. Scarring is most commonly caused by sufferers squeezing their spots at home or picking scabs which results in their skin scarring. The scarring can appear in many different forms and treatment options will vary based on severity and main concerns.

Skin aging refers to the natural process of the skin’s gradual deterioration over time, resulting in various changes in appearance and function. These changes can be caused by both intrinsic factors, such as genetics and hormonal changes, as well as extrinsic factors, such as sun exposure, pollution, and lifestyle choices like smoking and poor nutrition.

Back acne is common in people already suffering with acne and is generally worse in men but can also affect women. It can also appear in gym lovers as they get a build up of sweat, oil and dead skin. It is caused in the same way that acne is, the sebaceous (oil producing) glands are over stimulated causing bacteria to build up resulting in spot formation.

It can vary in severity from congestion and black heads, to pustular or cystic acne. It is very hard to manage at home due to it being such a difficult to reach area.

Blackheads are pores that have been clogged with oil or dirt. They are not naturally black, they oxidise the longer they are exposed to the air causing them to appear black. They are classified as a mild form of acne, however all skin types are susceptible to them.

Scars are fibrous tissue that replace normal skin tissue following injury, it is a natural part of the healing process. Scar tissue is composed of collagen (the same as healthy skin), but the fibre composition of it is different. The collagen fibres found in fibrosis tissue cross-links and forms a pronounced alignment in a single direction resulting in a scar.

Cellulite refers to the dimpled or lumpy appearance of the skin, particularly in areas like the thighs, buttocks, hips, and abdomen. It occurs when fat deposits push through the connective tissue beneath the skin, resulting in a bumpy texture. Cellulite is more common in women than men and can be influenced by various factors, including hormonal changes, genetics, poor circulation, and lifestyle choices.

Dark circles are characterised as dark purple or pigmented skin around the eyes, especially the under eye. They can be exacerbated by lines, wrinkles and thinning skin.

D├ęcolletage refers to the upper part of a woman’s torso, including the neck, shoulders, upper chest, and the area between the breasts. The skin on the d├ęcolletage area is thin and delicate, and is often exposed to sun damage and other environmental factors that can cause premature aging, such as smoking or poor nutrition. As a result, this area may develop wrinkles, fine lines, age spots, and other signs of aging faster than other parts of the body.

Dry skin can be characterised as flaking, scaly and rough textured. It can feel very tight and in severe cases it can even crack and bleed. The majority of people perceive that they have dry skin, however in a lot of cases this is not true. If you have a real dry skin condition you are born with it. Environmental factors and more commonly, using the wrong products at home are the main cause of dry skin.

When there are too many layers of built up dead skin this results in a dull complexion. When we are teenagers our natural skin cycle is 6 weeks from the birth of the cell to it naturally being exfoliated away (desquamation). As we age this process slows down, however environmental factors and not using the right products can also contribute. Simply increasing your skin’s exfoliating abilities will result in a shedding of this dead skin and a visibly more healthy, glowing appearance.

Eczema is a skin condition that causes patches of inflamed, itchy, red, cracked, and rough skin. Symptoms can vary, depending on age. Eczema most commonly develops before the age of 5 with dry and scaly patches visible on the skin that are very itchy. This can continue to develop into adolescence; however symptoms are often different to those experienced by children.

Eye wrinkles, also known as “crow’s feet,” are fine lines and wrinkles that form around the outer corners of the eyes. These wrinkles are a natural part of the aging process and are caused by a combination of factors, including the loss of collagen and elastin in the skin, repeated facial expressions such as squinting or smiling, and exposure to environmental factors such as sun damage.

When you are younger your skin works in a very productive way making plenty of Hyaluronic acid (hydration molecule), Elastin (keeps our skin bouncy) and Collagen (keeps our skin plump and youthful), however from the age of 20 your skin makes 1% less collagen and elastin every year. Its natural cell renewal process also slows down, resulting in the skin becoming lined, pigmented and wrinkled. External factors also contribute to premature ageing and lifestyle choices have a huge impact on your skin. Ageing is a fact of life, but looking your age is a choice!

Lips most commonly become dry or chapped due to being burned by the sun or as a result of fluctuations in temperature such as in the winter. When you are younger your skin works in a very productive way making plenty of Hyaluronic acid (hydration molecule), Elastin (keeps our skin bouncy) and Collagen (keeps our skin plump and youthful), however from the age of 20 your skin makes 1% less collagen and elastin every year. Its natural cell renewal process also slows down, resulting in the skin becoming lined, pigmented and wrinkled. External factors also contribute to premature ageing and lifestyle choices have a huge impact on your skin. Ageing is a fact of life, but looking your age is a choice!

Milia are small hard lumps found on the skin. They form when keratin (skin cells) become trapped under the skin. They cannot be removed simply by squeezing as they are too hard to pop. Milia most often appear on the face, commonly around the eyelids and cheeks, though they can appear anywhere.

Oily skin can be characterised as feeling greasy with a visible shine. It is a side effect of the sebaceous (oil producing) glands in the skin being over stimulated and producing too much sebum. Sebum is the waxy, oily substance that protects and hydrates the skin, however too much sebum can lead to an oily complexion, clogged pores, open pores and acne.

Pigmentation is characterised by uneven dark patches of skin tone. It can affect both men and women of all skin colours and vary in severity. Pigmentation forms when the melanocyte (pigment producing) cells are damaged or overstimulated and produce more melanin (pigmentation) in particular areas of the skin rather than distributing it evenly and giving you an even skin tone. There are several types of pigmentation and causes.

Psoriasis is a skin condition that causes red, flaky, crusty patches of skin. These patches normally appear on your elbows, knees, hands and lower back, but can appear anywhere on your body. Psoriasis is known to affect around 2% of the UK population.

Rosacea is characterised by redness and flushing, most commonly visible on the cheeks and nose. Nobody definitively knows what causes it and it can unfortunately not be cured, however we have plenty of options available to help to manage the symptoms. Most rosacea sufferers will find that they have ‘triggers’ that cause their Rosacea to flare up and get worse.

Seborrheic keratosis are common noncancerous skin growths. People tend to get more as they age. Seborrheic keratosis are usually brown or black. They appear waxy, scaly and slightly raised. They usually appear on the head, neck, chest or back. They are harmless and not contagious.

Skin laxity refers to the loss of skin elasticity and firmness that occurs as a natural part of the aging process. One of the most common areas where skin laxity is noticeable is in the lower face, particularly in the area around the jawline, which can lead to the formation of jowls.

Skin tags are small, soft, skin-coloured growths on the skin. They vary in colour and size from a few millimetres up to 5cm wide. They typically occur in areas where skin friction is common including the underarms, inner thighs, eyelids and neck. They are not dangerous but can be very annoying and uncomfortable if they get caught. It is important if you are unsure to check with your doctor as moles can commonly be mistaken for skin tags.

Stretch marks are long, narrow streaks or lines that develop on the skin when it is stretched or pulled beyond its normal limit. They can appear as reddish, purple, or brownish streaks when they first form, and then fade over time to a lighter color that is similar to the surrounding skin.

Thread veins are small capillaries (veins) which can appear on the face, neck, chest and legs. On the face, they are often a result of tiny blood vessels bursting which can be caused by increased pressure or sun damage. They are not dangerous and serve no purpose. Those who suffer from thread veins often feel the need to cover them up affecting their self-confidence.

Vellus hair (also known as peach fuzz) is found all over your body and is typically very fine and light. It is different to terminal hair which is found on top of the head, underarms and pubic area. Some people may find that this vellus hair is darker or longer and more visible in sunlight or when applying make-up. You cannot prevent vellus hair from growing as it is found all over the body apart from the palms of the hands and soles of the feet.

Xanthelasma are characterised as soft, yellowish, fatty deposits that form under the skin around the eyes. They are not harmful but can be an indicator of cholesterol issues so always get this checked by a doctor.